S'porean Girl Savagely Trolls Old Notes Scammer, He Threatens to Call the FBI

old notes scam
 
There is a new scam targeting Singaporeans through social media. When one of her friends almost fell victim to this new-age scam, this Singaporean girl took it into her own hands to teach the scammer a lesson.
 
If you have not already heard, the Singapore Police Force issued a police advisory on 16 April 2019 informing the public about scammers posing as interested buyers of old currency notes. These scammers typically use Facebook or Instagram as a medium to contact potential victims, informing them that they are collectors of old Singapore currency notes, and offering huge sums of money for each piece. The scammers' social media accounts will generally contain photographs of various old notes or their satisfied “customers” waving exorbitant amounts of cash as “proof” that they are reputable collectors. The scammers typically do not converse with their victims over Facebook or Instagram, preferring to carry out the conversation via WhatsApp, probably to avoid getting their social media accounts banned by the relevant platforms.
 
Once the victim agrees to a transaction, the scammer will issue fake bank receipts claiming that the money has been transferred, but the victim needs to pay administrative fees to an account before the money will be released to the victim's bank account. The money fails to materialize even after victims pay the administrative fees, and since the start of the year, at least $44,000 have been stolen from good hard-working citizens.
 
Cherylyn was minding her own business one day when her friend excitedly WhatsApped her asking if she has old notes to sell, as he was approached by an old notes collector who is generously offering $1,000 for each piece of discontinued $1 note. Cherylyn solemnly informed her friend that it was obviously a scam, as no one in the right mind would pay $1,000 for a note that can be bought on eBay or in shopping centres for as low as $2. Even then, her friend tried arguing that there are crazier things that happen and he does not mind losing out on an old $1 note in hopes of a windfall.
 
Exasperated and annoyed with her friend's idiocy and ignorance, Cherlyn took it upon herself to prove to her friend that this was indeed a scam while having fun along the way with the old notes scammer.
 
Continue scrolling for some good old fashioned trolling.
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn creates a back story about how she needs her money because her step father requires surgery on his axillary (which basically just means armpit).
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn decides to test the scammer's knowledge on old Singapore notes, sending a photo of the current circulated notes with a caption calling the man a scammer in Chinese. The scammer replies back to the photo claiming that the notes she sent are extremely valuable and that he will pay US$35,000 for all three notes. LOL!
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn plays it dumb and asks if the transaction can be made through eBay, a reputable website that safeguards both sellers and traders, but the scammer declines.
 
old notes scam
The scammer insists that he works on trust where he sends the whole sum of the money first and sellers of the old notes can send him the currency through mail when they have received the bank transfer.
 
old notes scam
More logistics follow suit.
 
old notes scam
The scammer proceeds to send a fake address where he claims that Cherylyn can mail the notes to when the bank transfer has been successful. He then asks Cherylyn for her bank details. Cherylyn replies with a fake bank account number “98188729”, which when read in Chinese can be translated to “The bar wants my father to drink alcohol.”
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn continues providing more pseudo bank account details. When asked for her name, in addition to “Cherylyn”, she supplements it with “Nishi Sha Bi” which means “you are a dumb c*nt” in Chinese.
 
old notes scam
The scammer sends a fake bank receipt with laughable credentials that states the payment of US$35,000 has been made to Cherylyn's bank account but with a note mentioning the payment of an “eviction fee” of RM750.
 
old notes scam
A closer look at the fake bank receipt just for laughs.
 
old notes scam
The scammer informs Cherylyn that she has to pay the “eviction fee” of RM750 to the “Malaysia Online International Transaction Agency” and gives some bullshit reasoning.
 
old notes scam
A closer look at the fake agency's request for the “eviction fee” to be paid to a specific person and account number. We love how the Maybank logos are misaligned.
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn continues acting dumb.
 
old notes scam
The trolling ensures.
 
old notes scam
The scammer starts getting angry.
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn asks if it is possible for the scammer to pay the transaction fee on behalf of her first and she will transfer the RM750 back to him upon receiving the $35,000.
 
old notes scam
The scammer starts getting impatient and beginds fear-mongering.
 
old notes scam
 Cherylyn sends the scammers screenshots of herself borrowing money from her friend (who is in the loop about the trolling).
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn sends the scammer a fake text about how she has transferred RM750 to the fake agency.
 
old notes scam
The scammer keeps insisting that she shows her a receipt for verification and Cherylyn retorts that the bank should be able to check on their end if they have received the money.
 
old notes scam
The scammer realizes that something is up and starts getting agitated with much hilarity and incoherence.
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn maintains that the bank should be able to check.
 
old notes scam
The scammer starts going off on a pathetic rant and threatens Cherylyn that “the FBI department will take this from here.”
 
old notes scam
Cherylyn pretends to see the FBI walking towards her house and sends a photo feigning horror.
 
old notes scam
The scammer attempts to regain his dignity after his massive fail.
 
FIN.
 
Remember kids, we do not advocate trolling, but when it comes to scammers, go nuts in wasting their time and effort, and remember to have fun while doing so, but do not give away any of your personal information.

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